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Understanding Your Dog

Check out this info. from WIKI……………………..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog

Intelligence

Main article: Dog intelligence

The Border Collie is considered to be one of the most intelligent breeds.[170]

The domestic dog has a predisposition to exhibit a social intelligence that is uncommon in the animal world.[113] Dogs are capable of learning in a number of ways, such as through simple reinforcement (e.g., classical or operant conditioning) and by observation.[113]

Dogs go through a series of stages of cognitive development. As with humans, the understanding that objects not being actively perceived still remain in existence (calledobject permanence) is not present at birth. It develops as the young dog learns to interact intentionally with objects around it, at roughly 8 weeks of age.[113]

Puppies learn behaviors quickly by following examples set by experienced dogs.[113]This form of intelligence is not peculiar to those tasks dogs have been bred to perform, but can be generalized to myriad abstract problems. For example, Dachshund puppies that watched an experienced dog pull a cart by tugging on an attached piece of ribbon in order to get a reward from inside the cart learned the task fifteen times faster than those left to solve the problem on their own.[113][171]

Dogs can also learn by mimicking human behaviors. In one study, puppies were presented with a box, and shown that, when a handler pressed a lever, a ball would roll out of the box. The handler then allowed the puppy to play with the ball, making it an intrinsic reward. The pups were then allowed to interact with the box. Roughly three-quarters of the puppies subsequently touched the lever, and over half successfully released the ball, compared to only 6% in a control group that did not watch the human manipulate the lever.[172] Another study found that handing an object between experimenters who then used the object’s name in a sentence successfully taught an observing dog each object’s name, allowing the dog to subsequently retrieve the item.[173]

Sergeant Stubby wearing his uniform and medals. Stubby participated in four offensives and 17 battles.

Dogs also demonstrate sophisticated social cognition by associating behavioral cues with abstract meanings.[113] One such class of social cognition involves the understanding that others are conscious agents. Research has shown that dogs are capable of interpreting subtle social cues, and appear to recognize when a human or dog’s attention is focused on them. To test this, researchers devised a task in which a reward was hidden underneath one of two buckets. The experimenter then attempted to communicate with the dog to indicate the location of the reward by using a wide range of signals: tapping the bucket, pointing to the bucket, nodding to the bucket, or simply looking at the bucket.[174] The results showed that domestic dogs were better thanchimpanzees, wolves, and human infants at this task, and even young puppies with limited exposure to humans performed well.[113]

Psychology research has shown that humans´ gaze instinctively moves to the left in order to watch the right side of a person’s face, which is related to use of right hemisphere brain for facial recognition, including human facial emotions. Research at theUniversity of Lincoln (2008) shows that dogs share this instinct when meeting a human being, and only when meeting a human being (i.e., not other animals or other dogs). As such they are the only non-primate species known to do so.[175][176]

Stanley Coren, an expert on dog psychology, states that these results demonstrated the social cognition of dogs can exceed that of even our closest genetic relatives, and that this capacity is a recent genetic acquisition that distinguishes the dog from its ancestor, the wolf.[113] Studies have also investigated whether dogs engaged in partnered play change their behavior depending on the attention-state of their partner.[177] Those studies showed that play signals were only sent when the dog was holding the attention of its partner. If the partner was distracted, the dog instead engaged in attention-getting behavior before sending a play signal.[177]

Coren has also argued that dogs demonstrate a sophisticated theory of mind by engaging in deception, which he supports with a number of anecdotes, including one example wherein a dog hid a stolen treat by sitting on it until the rightful owner of the treat left the room.[113] Although this could have been accidental, Coren suggests that the thief understood that the treat’s owner would be unable to find the treat if it were out of view. Together, the empirical data and anecdotal evidence points to dogs possessing at least a limited form of theory of mind.[113][177]

A study found a third of dogs suffered from anxiety when separated from others.[178]

border collie named Chaser has learned the names for 1,022 toys after three years of training, so many that her trainers have had to mark the names of the objects lest they forget themselves. This is higher than Rico, another border collie who could remember at least 200 objects.[179]

Behavior

Main article: Dog behavior

Although dogs have been the subject of a great deal of behaviorist psychology (e.g. Pavlov’s dog), they do not enter the world with a psychological “blank slate”.[113] Rather, dog behavior is affected by genetic factors as well as environmental factors.[113] Domestic dogs exhibit a number of behaviors and predispositions that were inherited from wolves.[113]

The Gray Wolf is a social animal that has evolved a sophisticated means of communication and social structure. The domestic dog has inherited some of these predispositions, but many of the salient characteristics in dog behavior have been largely shaped by selective breeding by humans. Thus some of these characteristics, such as the dog’s highly developed social cognition, are found only in primitive forms in grey wolves.[174]

Properly socialized dogs can interact with unfamiliar dogs of any size and shape and understand how to communicate.

The existence and nature of personality traits in dogs have been studied (15329 dogs of 164 different breeds) and five consistent and stable “narrow traits” identified, described as playfulness, curiosity/fearlessness, chase-proneness, sociability and aggressiveness. A further higher order axis for shyness–boldness was also identified.[180][181]

The average sleep time of a dog is said to be 10.1 hours per day.[182] Like humans, dogs have two main types of sleep: Slow-wave sleep, then Rapid eye movement sleep, the state in which dreams occur.[183]

Dog growl

A new study in Budapest, Hungary, has found that dogs are able to tell how big another dog is just by listening to its growl. A specific growl is used by dogs to protect their food. The research also shows that dogs do not lie about their size, and this is the first time research has shown animals can determine another’s size by the sound it makes. The test, using images of many kinds of dogs, showed a small and big dog and played a growl. The result showed that 20 of the 24 test dogs looked at the image of the appropriate-sized dog first and looked at it longest.[184]

Differences from wolves

Some dogs, like this Tamaskan Dog, look very much like wolves.

Physical characteristics

Further information: Wolf

Compared to equally sized wolves, dogs tend to have 20% smaller skulls, 30% smaller brains,[185] as well as proportionately smaller teeth than other canid species.[186] Dogs require fewer calories to function than wolves. It is thought by certain experts that the dog’s limp ears are a result of atrophy of the jaw muscles.[186] The skin of domestic dogs tends to be thicker than that of wolves, with some Inuit tribes favoring the former for use as clothing due to its greater resistance to wear and tear in harsh weather.[186]

Behavioral differences

Dogs tend to be poorer than wolves at observational learning, being more responsive toinstrumental conditioning.[186] Feral dogs show little of the complex social structure ordominance hierarchy present in wolf packs. For example, unlike wolves, the dominant alpha pairs of a feral dog pack do not force the other members to wait for their turn on a meal when scavenging off a dead ungulate as the whole family is free to join in. For dogs, other members of their kind are of no help in locating food items, and are more like competitors.[186]

Feral dogs are primarily scavengers, with studies showing that unlike their wild cousins, they are poor ungulate hunters, having little impact on wildlife populations where they are sympatric. However, feral dogs have been reported to be effective hunters of reptiles in the Galápagos Islands,[187] and free ranging pet dogs are more prone to predatory behavior toward wild animals.

Domestic dogs can be monogamous.[188] Breeding in feral packs can be, but does not have to be restricted to a dominant alpha pair (such things also occur in wolf packs).[189] Male dogs are unusual among canids by the fact that they mostly seem to play no role in raising their puppies, and do not kill the young of other females to increase their own reproductive success.[187] Some sources say that dogs differ from wolves and most other large canid species by the fact that they do not regurgitate food for their young, nor the young of other dogs in the same territory.[186]

However, this difference was not observed in all domestic dogs. Regurgitating of food by the females for the young as well as care for the young by the males has been observed in domestic dogs, dingos as well as in other feral or semi-feral dogs. Regurgitating of food by the females and direct choosing of only one mate has been observed even in those semi-feral dogs of direct domestic dog ancestry. Also regurgitating of food by males has been observed in free-ranging domestic dogs.[188][190]

Trainability

Dogs display much greater tractability than tame wolves, and are, in general, much more responsive to coercive techniques involving fear, aversive stimuli, and force than wolves, which are most responsive toward positive conditioning and rewards.[191] Unlike tame wolves, dogs tend to respond more to voice than hand signals.[192]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog

 

 

Dog behavior

Here is information that may help you to understand your Dog.

Check it out……………………..

From WIKI:     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_behavior

 

Dog behavior refers to the collection of behaviors by the domestic dog, Canis lupus familiaris, and is believed to be influenced by genetic, social, situational and environmental causes. The domestic dog is a subspecies of the grey wolf, and shares many of its behavioral characteristics.

Although there are important and distinct differences between dogs and wolves, contemporary views of dog behavior are heavily influenced by research on wild wolves.

The social unit of dogs is the pack. From research on wolf packs that are formed in captivity, the pack has traditionally been thought of as a tightly knit group composed of individuals that have earned a ranking in a linear hierarchy, and within which there is intense loyalty. It is believed that dogs were able to be domesticated by and succeed in contact with human society because of their social nature. According to this traditional belief, dogs generalize their social instincts to include humans, in essence “joining the pack” of their owner/handler.

However, much of this traditional view is based on findings from grey wolf packs that are formed of unrelated animals in captivity, and thus may not apply to natural wolf packs, natural dog packs, or dogs incorporated into a human household. Research in packs formed in the wild indicates that wolves form a family group, including a breeding pair and their offspring. In these familial packs, the terms “dominance,” and “submission” are less useful than “parent,” and “offspring,” and bring with them a number of misconceptions. While the majority of research to date indicates that domestic dogs conform to a hierarchy around an Alpha-Beta-Omega structure, domestic dogs, like their wild wolf counterparts, also interact in complex hierarchical ways.

The existence and nature of personality traits in dogs have been studied (15,329 dogs of 164 different breeds) and five consistent and stable “narrow traits” identified, described as playfulness, curiosity/fearlessness, chase-proneness, sociability and aggressiveness. A further higher-order axis for shyness–boldness was also identified.[1][2]

Dogs value the companionship of the others in their “pack” and are sometimes distressed if they are separated from it. Typical reactions when a dog is separated from the pack are barking, howling, digging, and chewing. These activities may distress humans when they need to leave dogs alone for a period of time. However, this behavior, called separation anxiety, can be overcome with training, or at least decreased to the point where it becomes manageable. If young puppies are habituated to periods alone from an early age, this can normally be prevented entirely.

Dogs are also crepuscular, meaning their natural period of peak activity is dawn and dusk,[3] and may be content to rest during the day and night (because of this trait, domestic dogs are more likely to show barking and chewing activity at times when people are leaving to or returning from work.[4]). Some owners struggling to deal with this problem resort to devocalization, a controversial practice considered cruel by animal advocates and outlawed in many countries.

Dr. David Mech of the University of Minnesota, who has studied wolves in their natural habitat, claims that much of what is widely believed about wolf packs is mistaken. From observations of wolf packs on Ellesmere Island over more than a decade,[5] he claims that natural wolf packs are not at all similar to those formed in captivity by unrelated wolves. He attributes many of the misconceptions about wolf packs to generalizations from these unnatural packs in captivity, and equates this to erroneous inferences we might draw from generalizing human behavior from studying refugee camps.

Dr. Mech argues that the natural wolf pack is typically a family, with a breeding pair of adult wolves and their offspring. In such cases, the terms “alpha” and “dominant” are less appropriate than “parent.” Of course, the parent wolves are both “alpha” and “dominant” (by definition), but he argues that these terms are misleading because they imply that a pack of wolves typically include multiple families and that the members assume a place in a linear hierarchy. A wolf pack should not be seen as a tribe of individuals who have an established place in a hierarchy until a younger dog usurps the role. Rather, a wolf pack should be seen as a family unit, with young wolves of age dispersing into new territories of their own, to find other wolves and begin their own family units.

Mech also states that dominance is rare in wild wolves, and does not arise from sexual competition. Because young wolves usually disperse before age two, and almost always before age three, there is little sexual tension within a pack. Instead of “dominance” and “submission,” he uses the terms “assertiveness” and “passiveness” to reflect the role of the wolf in the pack. Dominant breeding pairs led the pack most of the time (71%), and initiated most new behaviors (70%). Leadership behavior in subordinate pack members tended to be followed by dispersion.[6]

It is believed by some that dogs establish a dominance hierarchy through aggressive play and roughhousing along a continuum of dominance and submission,[citation needed] although the concept of social hierarchies in dogs is unproven and controversial. It is important for successful socialization that puppies participate with their littermates in learning to relate to other dogs. Dogs learn to successfully relate to other dogs by keeping the peace, rather than by constantly fighting to reestablish this hierarchy.

Although dogs are commonly characterized in terms of their dominance (e.g., “Fido is the alpha.”), there is some controversy as to whether dominance is a stable personality trait.

In wild wolf packs, displays of dominance have been observed to include “licking up,” which involves essentially begging for food; “pinning,” in which the dominant dog appears to threaten another, which shows submission by rolling over; “standing over”; territorial marking; and more passive expressions of body language, including holding the tail and ears erect, looking directly at other dogs, circling and sniffing other dogs, growling if the other dog moves.

Submissive displays mirror dominant displays and include adopting a posture that is physically lower than other dogs, such as crouching, rolling over on the back and exposing the abdomen, lowering the tail (sometimes to the point of tucking it between the legs), flattening of the ears, averting the gaze, nervously licking or swallowing, dribbling of urine, and freezing or fleeing when other dogs are encountered.

In wolves, recent research has indicated that dominant behaviors have been misinterpreted as personality traits that determine the individual’s place in a linear hierarchy in the pack. In contrast, Mech (see recent research, above) argues that packs are family units, and that the “alpha” of a pack does not change through struggles for dominance. Rather, he argues that the family unit serves to raise the young, which then disperse to pair up with other dispersed wolves to form a breeding pair, and a pack of their own. This model undermines the popular conception of dominance in wolf social behavior.

Research on canine familiaris has also questioned whether dominance is a personality trait. Svartberg and colleagues (2002) gathered behavioral data from 15,000 dogs of 164 breeds in attempt to identify major personality traits. In an approach similar to those used in humans, the authors performed a factor analysis of their data, and identified five major traits: “Playfulness,” “Curiosity/Fearlessness,” “Chase-proneness,” “Sociability,” “Aggressiveness.” A similar analysis by Goddard and Beilharz (1985) revealed two major factors in social behavior: “Confidence,” and “Aggression–dominance.”

These studies suggest that dominance, per se, may not be a personality trait. Rather, underlying personality traits such as aggressiveness, confidence and curiosity may affect the prevalence of dog behaviors that are viewed as dominant.

Research has shown that there are individual differences in the interactions between dogs and their human masters that have significant effects on dog behavior. For instance, Topal and colleagues (1997) have shown that the type of relationship between dog and master, characterized as eithercompanionship or working relationship, significantly affected the dog’s performance on a cognitive problem-solving task. They speculate that companion dogs have a more dependent relationship with their owners, and look to them to solve problems. In contrast, working dogs are more independent.

Dog attacks are attacks on humans by feral or domestic dogs. With the close association of dogs and humans in daily life (largely as pets), dog attacks—with injuries from very minor to significant, and severe to fatal—are not uncommon. Attacks on the serious end of the spectrum have become the focus of increasing media and public attention in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.[7]

It is estimated that two percent of the US population, 4.7 million people, are bitten each year.[8] In the 1980s and 1990s the US averaged 17 fatalities per year, while in the 2000s this has increased to 26.[9] 77% of dog bites are from the pet of family or friends, and 50% of attacks occur on the dog owner’s property.[9]

There is considerable debate on whether or not certain breeds of dogs are inherently more prone to commit attacks causing serious injury (i.e., so driven by instinct and breeding that, under certain circumstances, they are exceedingly likely to attempt or commit dangerous attacks). Regardless of the breed of the dog, it is recognized that the risk of dangerous dog attacks can be greatly increased by human actions (such as neglect or fight training) or inactions (as carelessness in confinement and control).

A person bitten by an animal potentially carrying parvovirus or rabies virus should consult a medical doctor immediately. A bite victim may also incur serious bacterial infections of the bone called osteomyelitis which can become life threatening if untreated, whether or not the animal has parvovirus or rabies virus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published in 2000 a study on dog bite-related fatalities (DBRF) that covered the years 1979-1998. The study found reports of 327 people killed by dogs over the 20-year period. Using newspaper articles, the CDC was able to obtain breed “identifications” for 238 of the 327 cases of fatal dog attacks; of which “pit bull terrier” or mixes thereof were reportedly involved in 76 cases. The breed with the next-highest number of attributed fatalities was the Rottweiler and mixes thereof, with 44 fatalities.

From a young age, dogs engage in play with one another. Dog play is made up primarily of mock fights. It is believed that this behavior, which is most common in puppies, is training for important behaviors later in life. Research on puppy play has shown that puppies do not engage equally in both dominant and submissive roles in fights; rather, puppies will tend to start play fights with weaker puppies they believe they can dominate.[10]

Additionally, puppies will intervene in play engaged by other pairs. In these situations, the puppies overwhelmingly aid the dominant dog. Puppies do not show reciprocity in interventions, suggesting that they prefer to be dominant in a fight, and are being opportunistic in the short-term. In the long-term, intervention may aid the puppies in learning coordination.

A common behavior among domesticated dogs is chasing their own tails. Researchers are not completely certain why dogs chase their own tail, however some research studies found a link between tail-chasing and high cholesterol. A study found that when dogs experience an increase in activity of hormones tied to the “fight or flight” response, it causes dogs to chase their tails more often.[11]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_behavior

Dog Barking Problem?

Check this out!

I have seen Cesar’s TV Shows & have learned a lot.

If you are experiencing a dog barking problem you should take a look here.

Cesar knows his stuff……………..

http://www.cesarsway.com/channel/dog-behavior/dog-barking

Cesar Millan’s Best Tips to Stop Dog Barking

By Cesar Millan

Remember, barking is natural! It’s an important means of communication for dogs. But sometimes problems can develop. As the pack leader, it’s your job to step in and control excessive barking. Here are my 5 tips to help you stop nuisance barking for good.

1. Correct dog problem behavior and follow through.

Tell your dog to stop barking using a look, a sound, or a physical correction. But don’t stop there. Your dog may pause and then go right back to what he was doing. His body relaxed, but his brain was still on alert. Be patient. Wait until your dog completely submits before you go back to what you were doing.

2. Stay calm when trying to stop dog barking.

Constant barking can be irritating, but you won’t be able to correct the dog behavior problem if you are frustrated. Animals don’t follow unbalanced leaders. In fact, your dog will mirror your energy. If you’re frustrated, he will be, too! And barking is a great release for that frustrated energy. Take a moment to curb your own internal barking first.

3. Stake your claim to stop the barking.

Is your dog barking over and over again at the same object, person, situation, or place? Then you need to step up and claim that stimulus as your own. Use your body, your mind, and your calm-assertive energy to create an invisible wall that your dog is not allowed to cross. Do it with 100% dedication and focus, and the results may surprise you.

4. Stop the barking by challenging your dog mentally and physically.

Excessive barking is often the result of pent-up energy. If this is the case, the solution is simple: release that energy in more productive ways. Does your dog receive a daily walk? Can you make the walk more challenging with a bicycle, a backpack, or by walking on an incline? Can you provide more mental challenges, such as herding, agility training, or simple obedience games? There are many, many ways to increase the challenges in your dog’s life. Find one that you enjoy that your dog can participate in safely.

5. Get professional help to stop dog barking.

When you brought this dog into your life, you made a commitment to provide the care he needs. Prevent dog barking, and other dog behavior problems by calling in a canine professional to help him cope with a behavior issue.

http://www.cesarsway.com/channel/dog-behavior/dog-barking
Read more: http://www.cesarsway.com/tips/problembehaviors/5-tips-for-handling-nuisance-barking#ixzz2Poj1r8Ki

 

Introduction to How to Train a Dog

Here is a  Great Place to pick-up some Dog Training Basics……. Check it out!

http://animal.discovery.com/pets/how-to-train-a-dog.htm

 

Here is an example of the Great Info. you will find on this site.

Introduction to How to Train a Dog

By Dr. William Fortney

Among the many important responsibilities dog owners have, training a dog is among the most important. Well-trained pets are easier to care for and love, cause less damage to your home (and theirs), and live happier lives. In this article, we cover many of the basics of dog training. But we also cover some important facets of dogs themselves — which you need to be familiar with in order to communicate with your pooch.These include how dogs communicate to you through body language and noises. Dogs send myriad messages with their bodies and their voices — this is one reason why they’re so fascinating and beloved. The more you understand their messages, the more you understand them and how your own messages are being understood. Read this entire article carefully — there are three sections after this one — and then put the wisdom into practice. Here’s what we’ll cover:

Understanding a Dog’s Body Language

Dogs use their entire body to communicate. Their eyes and ears are especially dynamic, and they give sure-fire clues to dogs’ emotions and impulses. How dogs tilt their heads, move their legs and torsos, wag (or raise or drop) their tails — all these things contribute to the messages being sent. In this section, we cover many of the silent messages your pooch will give you, from his nose to his tail.

Interpreting Dog Barks and Noises

Dogs are probably the most “verbally” expressive of all domesticated animals, and this only adds to their charm. From the whine of a puppy to the angry growl of an adult, dogs mean what they say. The more you understand these signals, the happier you and your dog will be. At the same time, it’s important to know which noises constitute an annoyance, and how to train your dog to stop making them. We’ll offer suggestions on teaching a dog to stop barking in this section.

Dog-Training Tips

It’s important to know not only how to train a dog, but what to train it to do. Puppies have no sense of correct behavior, so they offer a million things you could correct; which should you address? In this section, we’ll cover what to correct as well as how to train a pooch. We’ll also discuss dog obediences classes — also known as puppy kindergarten — and specific thing you can teach your dog if you plan on traveling with it. Life tosses up myriad challenges to a dog’s sense of obedience, and the more he’s trained to understand, the happier you both will be. Finally, for fun and practical benefit, we’ll cover a few basic tricks you can teach your dog. They’re a wonderful way to bond with your pet and to entertain the both of you, while teaching it how to behave and react to your commands. Everybody wins!

Go take a look!

http://animal.discovery.com/pets/how-to-train-a-dog.htm

BOSTON: Bomb Sniffing Dogs

Hard at Work helping Police in Boston & surrounding areas search for Bombs.

These Heroic Bomb Sniffing Dogs are proving to be invaluable in the fight against terrorist.

Officials have noted that Dogs swept the area for explosives twice before the first runners crossed the finish line and that the dogs would not have been able to smell the gun powder in a airtight sealed unit like a pressure cooker. It is thought that the bombs exteriors had been wiped clean of any residue or odors to assure they would go undetected by the dogs.

Dog Sniffing for Bomb

Check this out………………………

Article from

The Daily Dish

By Paul Ciampanelli Apr 16th 2013

Following the bombings at the Boston Marathon, law enforcement throughout the area are on high alert and using bomb-sniffing dogs, according to WLNE-TV.

The neighboring state of Rhode Island has dispatched four of their bomb-sniffing K-9 units to help out in Boston after receiving a request from Massachusetts State Police.

Rhode Island’s state and local law enforcement and their dogs are also exercising high alert in public areas.

In fact, bomb-sniffing dogs have been hard at work in most major cities throughout the country, combing public areas, landmarks, government buildings and sporting events to ensure that the bombings that occurred in Boston yesterday don’t happen elsewhere.

Major airports in Los Angeles and San Francisco have increased police-dog presence, and cities including Atlanta, Detroit, Las Vegas and Seattle are looking to do the same.

Bomb-sniffing dogs are trained to detect thousands of possible ingredients in explosive devices, according to Discovery News. Details about the types of explosives used in the Boston Marathon bombing aren’t yet known.

The Joy of having a dog.

DOGS ……….Your New Best Friend

My Best Dog

It all starts when you shop for your first Dog. The puppies are running around with happy tails wagging and playfull antics that capture your attention and heart. Their cute little faces look as though they are smiling ……. Puppies are little bundles of joy just exude Love and Joy. You know you are hooked when they beg you to pet them and you get your first puppy kiss from this wiggly happy little guy.

Now the big moment, which one will you choose?  Well, my experience has taught me that this won’t be a problem because your puppy will choose you. You just know!

The relationship starts. You and your dog are now starting a journey through life that you will never forget. The friendship and love your dog will bring to you and your family is absolutely amazing. Those loving eyes, happy face, wagging tail, and playful personality will bring you great joy.  You will carry these wonderful memories through your whole life.

Unconditional love is the gift dogs’ offer. As a puppy grows into your best friend an unbreakable bond is created. Always waiting to greet you with a smile, happy wagging tail, and always ready for an adventure. You make their day by just throwing their ball and playing with them. A dog will warn you of danger, try to rescue you if you need help, and fight off any threats. They will become your best friend. They never ask for much but they will always give you their all.

Yes, owing a Dog will bring you great joy.

Adopt a Pet Today!

Love Your Dog TODAY!

HAVE YOU LOVED YOUR DOG TODAY? ……. DO IT NOW!

Here are some of the dogs….. Past & Current, who we have had as members of our family.

Jip …past, Pepper …past, Suzie …past, Muchie …past, Cookie ( LuLu) …past,

Sadie Sue …current.

We have always Loved Dogs. We appreciate them and will always remember them for their devotion to us and the wonderful joy they gave us.

Love Your Dog TODAY!

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Remembering Zanjeer, The Golden Labrador Who Saved …

 

Here is an article from The Huffington Post News Service that will touch your Heart.

A Hero……………. A Friend…………… A Lifesaver…………….. Zanjeer The Golden Lab.

Remembering Zanjeer, The Golden Labrador Who Saved …
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/22/zanjeer-labrador-mumbai_n_2932946.html
2 days ago Story continues after photo zanjeer labrador mumbai. The dog died of bone cancer in 2000, the Pune Mirror reported. He was eight years old.

 

In March 1993, a series of 12 bombs went off across Mumbai.

The serial blasts left 257 dead and 713 injured. But in the aftermath, an unlikely hero emerged. According to Reuters, a golden labrador named Zanjeer worked with the bomb squad and saved thousands of lives by detecting “more than 3,329 kgs of the explosive RDX, 600 detonators, 249 hand grenades and 6406 rounds of live ammunition.” He helped avert three more bombs in the days following the blasts.

On the 20th anniversary of the bomb blasts, an image of Zanjeer being honored by the city’s police has gone viral on Facebook.

zanjeer

The dog died of bone cancer in 2000, the Pune Mirror reported. He was eight years old.

In the photo above, a senior police officer lays a wreath of flowers on Zanjeer as he was buried with full police honors at a widely-attended ceremony.

Mumbai’s police dog squad has been operational since December 1959, the Times of India reported. It began with just three Doberman Pinschers, who were used for tracking criminals.

A labor union leader and dog lover Dilip Mohite told Mid-Day that Zanjeer’s extraordinary detection skills deserved recognition.

“Policemen who die a martyr’s death get accolades, but canine members go unnoticed,” Mohite told the newspaper.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/22/zanjeer-labrador-mumbai_n_2932946.html

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